The EAG Council is made of Officer Councillor and Councillor positions. Each year, several positions become vacant.
Officer Councillors are elected by the Council and serve for various terms according to the position. Councillors are directly elected by the EAG Members and serve for three years, participate in council discussions, decisions and initiatives. Up to two Councillors can be appointed by the Council in connection with specific activities.

Elections of the EAG Council 2020

Three councillor positions will open in the EAG Council in January 2020 and EAG members have been invited to vote from 30 October to 22 November 2019. We wish to thank all our members for their participation, which reached 37% this year, with 1218 votes received. We are especially grateful to all candidates for agreeing to stand for elections.

Heather Buss (University of Bristol), Nadia Malaspina (University of Milano-Bicocca) and Jill Sutton (University of Brest) have been elected.

Heather Buss
University of Bristol

Nadia Malaspina
University of Milano-Bicocca

Jill Sutton
University of Brest

Candidates for the elections of the EAG Council 2020:

Heather Buss, University of Bristol, UK

Attila Demény, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Hungary

Ambre Luguet, University of Bonn, Germany

Nadia Malaspina, University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy

Philip Pogge von Strandmann, University College London and Birkbeck, UK

Jill Sutton, University of Brest, France

Past Council Elections

Elections of the EAG Council 2019

Election of Councillors by EAG Members

The Council elections took place from 16 October until 7 November 2018. 4 candidates were proposed and EAG members were invited to vote by selecting 2. Participation reached 36%, with 1300 votes. We thank EAG members for their participation. Kate Kiseeva, University College Cork, Ireland, and Alberto Vitale Brovarone, University of Torino, Italy & CNRS, France were elected and officially joined the EAG Council in January 2019. We are very grateful to all candidates for agreeing to stand for these elections.

Candidates for the elections of the EAG Council 2019:

Itay Halevy, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel

Christian Hallman, Max-Planck-Institute for Biogeochemistry & University of Bremen, Germany

Kate Kiseeva, University College Cork, Ireland

Alberto Vitale Brovarone, University of Torino, Italy & CNRS, France

Election of Councillors by the EAG Council

The Council has elected two additional councillors in connection with the organisation of Goldschmidt2021.
Dan Frost, University of Bayreuth, Germany will serve the council as Goldschmidt Officer and co-chair for the Goldschmit2021 Organising and Science Committees.
Maud Boyet, University Clermont-Auvergne, France, will serve as co-chair for the Goldschmit2021 Organising and Science Committees.
Both Dan and Maud will begin their term in 2019.

In addition, Mihály Pósfai, who joined the EAG Council in 2018, has been elected to serve as EAG Secretary from 2019.

Elections of the EAG Council 2018

Election of Councillors by EAG Members

The Council elections took place from Wednesday 11 October until Wednesday 8 November. 4 candidates were proposed and EAG members were invited to vote by selecting 2. Participation reached 42%, the highest to date, with 1564 votes.
Caroline Peacock
(University of Leeds, UK) and Encarnación Ruiz Agudo (University of Granada, Spain) were elected.

Candidates for the elections of the EAG Council 2018:

Riccardo Avanzinelli, University of Florence, Italy
Riccardo Avanzinelli_150Biography

Riccardo Avanzinelli is an associate professor of petrology and isotope geochemistry at Università degli Studi di Firenze in Italy since 2013. He has done his PhD in Firenze and carried out his postdoctoral research at the University of Bristol (UK). Riccardo’s research focuses on the application of trace elements and traditional and novel isotope tracers for investigating the genesis of magmas in different geodynamic settings and the cycling of elements within Earth through subduction and volcanism. In his current research he is also employing detailed in situ geochemical and isotopic work to unravel the nature and composition of shallow magmatic reservoirs, in relationship with major eruptive events, and the timescales of the processes occurring within magma chambers.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

As a geochemist working on interdisciplinary topics like volcanology and geodynamics I learned the importance of the communication and interaction between geochemistry and the other disciplines of the Geosciences, and the need to integrate and combine different approaches in order to solve key scientific questions. If elected, I will do my best to help the EAG promote actions that will strengthen such cooperation, through conferences like Goldschmidt or workshops. The EAG is doing a lot to provide opportunities for young researchers to develop their careers and I will be happy to contribute and improve the excellent work done so far, especially promoting actions to encourage mobility between different research groups in Europe.

Horst Marschall, University of Frankfurt, Germany
Horst Marschall_150Biography

Horst Marschall is the Wilhelm Heraeus Professor for Deep Earth Processes at Goethe Universität Frankfurt in Germany, working in the fields of high-temperature geochemistry, geochronology and petrology. He received a Diplom degree from Universität Heidelberg in 2000 and a doctoral degree in 2005 with a thesis on the elemental and isotopic fractionation of lithium and boron and their redistribution during metasomatic processes in subduction zones. This was followed by a five-year postdoctoral period at the University of Bristol (UK), where he work on subduction zone processes, crust formation and crustal melting. Marschall worked as a staff scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (Massachusetts) from 2011 to 2016 before returning to Europe. He is an associate editor for GCA since 2015.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

Scientists have always played a pioneering role in transcending national borders and collaborating globally for the progress of their disciplines and of society as a whole. As a council member, I would contribute to the European and international perspective of EAG, which is a vital aspect in the face of looming or growing tribalism that puts pressure on scientists. I would also strengthen the collaboration of geochemistry and neighbouring disciplines, such as mineralogy, petrology or economic geology, which have their interests represented by various separate groups. The Goldschmidt conference for me is the prime scientific event of the year. I have been a theme leader for two past European Goldschmidt conferences and I am looking forward to being involved in the organisation of future meetings in Boston, Barcelona and beyond.

Caroline Peacock, University of Leeds, UK
Caroline Peacock_150Biography

Caroline Peacock is an Associate Professor of Biogeochemistry at University of Leeds, UK. She completed a PhD in Geochemistry at University of Bristol in 2005, and worked there as a Postdoctoral Research Associate until 2006, before moving to University of Southampton as a Lecturer in Geochemistry until 2009 when she joined Leeds. Caroline’s research focuses on the application of fundamental chemical principles to understanding Earth system processes. In particular she focuses on the environmental behaviour of nutrients and contaminants in water, soils and sediments, and the molecular scale reactions that determine the uptake and release of these elements from soil and sediment minerals and microbes. In 2015 Caroline was awarded the EAG Houtermans Medal, and in 2016 she was granted a European Research Council Consolidator Grant to investigate controls on the preservation and burial of organic carbon in marine sediments. Caroline currently serves on several national and international research committees, and she leads the University of Leeds Cohen Geochemistry Group.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

My motivations to serve as an EAG councillor are two-fold. Firstly I would like to help the EAG in its mission to promote and support geochemistry across Europe. Now more than ever the field of geochemistry encompasses a multitude of disciplines, and links with many other research areas. My own research is multidisciplinary and because of this I have served, and currently sit, on several national and international research committees and learned societies. I would like to bring this expertise to the EAG council, and input into current and future EAG activities that showcase European geochemical research and bring together European geochemical researchers. Secondly I am keen to help the EAG continue and expand its support for early career researchers. I currently sit on the Houtermans Award Nomination Committee, and as a recipient of the award myself, I can attest to the positive impact of this type of recognition and support. As an EAG councillor I would like to explore new ways to promote early career researchers, including ways to support networking and funding opportunities.

Encarnacion Ruiz-Agudo, University of Granada, Spain
Encarni Ruiz-Agudo_150Biography

Encarnacion Ruiz Agudo is assistant professor in Crystallography and Mineralogy at the University of Granada (Spain). She finished her PhD research in 2007 and carried out her postdoctoral research at the University of Münster (Germany). Her research interests include 1) non-classical mechanisms of mineral formation, including the formation of amorphous precursors and prenucleation species, 2) studies of surface mineral reactivity at the nanoscale and 3) silicate weathering and surface altered layer formation. In 2012, she was awarded the Research Excellent Medal of the European Mineralogical Union. She coordinates several research projects funded by the Spanish government aiming at gaining fundamental knowledge on silicate weathering and carbonation.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

I am interested in becoming a councillor in order to contribute to the EAG community by sharing perspectives of an early career professor. If elected, I would work to continue the excellent work that has been done and to implement new ideas and ways to promote the visibility of early career scientists. If elected, I look forward to contributing to the meetings, publications and programs that EAG supports, and developing new opportunities that support and encourage young scientists from diverse backgrounds.

Election of Councillors by the EAG Council

The Council has elected three additional councillors: Sami Mikhail (University of St Andrews, UK) as the new Early Career Councillor, Mihály Pósfai (University of Pannonia, Hungary) to enhance representation of Eastern Europe within the Council and Derek Vance (ETH Zürich, Switzerland) as Vice-President from 2019.

Sami Mikhail has been elected as the new Early Career Councillor and will also act as Student Program Leader for Goldschmidt2019 in Barcelona.
Sami is a lecturer at the University of St Andrews, UK. Prior to this he spent two years as a Carnegie Postdoctoral Fellow at the Carnegie Institution of Washington, followed by a couple of postdoc positions at the Universities of Bristol and Edinburgh, UK. His research is driven by the desire to understand how the interior workings of a planet influences its surface environment, and how this relates to long-term habitability. To achieve this he employs light volatile-element stable isotope data (C-N-O-Noble gases) from natural samples and complements these data with both high-pressure/temperature experiments and theoretical models. These data are presently being applied to study diamond-formation in Earth’s mantle, high-temperature nitrogen geochemistry, and the fundamental relationships between mantle processes and atmospheric chemistry on Earth, Mars and Venus.

Mihaly Posfai_150Mihály Pósfai has been elected to enhance representation of Eastern Europe within the Council.
Mihály is a professor of environmental science at the University of Pannonia in Veszprém, Hungary. He obtained his PhD at Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, then continued as a postdoc at Arizona State University, specializing in transmission electron microscope studies of nanoscale phenomena related to environmental mineralogy problems. His current research interests include biomineralization and biomimetic synthesis of magnetic nanostructures, the nucleation of carbonate minerals in freshwater ecosystems, and the properties and climate effects of individual atmospheric particles. More information and a list of publications can be found here.

Derek Vance_150Derek Vance has been elected to join the council as he will be EAG Vice-President from 2019, and will act as co-chair for the Goldschmidt meeting in Barcelona in 2019.
Derek is Professor of Geochemistry in the Department of Earth Science at ETH Zürich, Switzerland. In the past he has worked on mantle geochemistry and has used geochronology and metamorphic petrology to understand mountain belts such as the Alps and Himalaya. For the past 10-15 years, however, he has focussed on understanding the geochemistry of the surface Earth. This has involved the quantification of the global cycles of trace elements through investigations of the inputs to the dissolved pool of the oceans, and outputs to various kinds of sediments. An important long-term objective is to use this effort, targeted at understanding modern budgets, to understand the chemical evolution of the surface Earth in the past.
Derek obtained his Ph.D. in geochemistry at the University of Cambridge, UK. He has previously served in various capacities with the Geochemical Society. He is currently a co-editor in chief for Earth and Planetary Science Letters, and has acted as an editor of Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems and as an Associate Editor for Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta.

Elections of the EAG Council 2017

Election of Councillors by EAG Members

The Council Elections 2017 took place from 3 October until 31 October 2016. 6 candidates were proposed and EAG Members were invited to vote by selecting 3. Participation reached 39% with 1152 votes.
Rizlan Bernier-Latmani (EPFL, Switzerland), Carsten Münker (University of Cologne, Germany) and Emily Pope (University of Copenhagen) were elected.

Candidates for the elections of the EAG Council 2017:

Rizlan Bernier-Latmani, EPFL, Switzerland
Biography

Rizlan Bernier-Latmani is an associate Professor of Environmental Microbiology at Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), in Switzerland. She studied Natural Resources at Cornell University (USA) and obtained her Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering at Stanford University (USA) in 2001. She also did a post-doc at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (USA). Her research focus is geomicrobiology and involves understanding how microbes interact with the geosphere, particularly with respect to metal contaminants and their mobility in the environment.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

Because of the interdisciplinary nature of my work, I have been part of many professional associations, ranging from chemistry to microbiology and I have found EAG to best suited to my specific background. Thus, I am interested in becoming a councillor in order to contribute to the EAG community as well as to the (bio)geoscience community at large. If elected, I would work to continue the excellent work that has been done and to implement new ideas and activities. I would like to help EAG continue to be a good home for both the diverse sub-fields of geochemistry as well as for interdisciplinary research. More specifically, I would like to find creative ways to promote the visibility of (bio)geoscience and boost the prospects of early career scientists.

Sami Mikhail, University of St Andrews, UK
Biography

Sami Mikhail is a lecturer at the University of St Andrews, UK. Prior to this he spent two years as a Carnegie Postdoctoral Fellow at the Carnegie Institution of Washington, followed by a couple of postdoc positions at the Universities of Bristol and Edinburgh, UK. His research is driven by the desire to understand how the interior workings of a planet influences its surface environment, and how this relates to long-term habitability. To achieve this he employs light volatile-element stable isotope data (C-N-O-Noble gases) from natural samples and complements these data with both high-pressure/temperature experiments and theoretical models. These data are presently being applied to study diamond-formation in Earth’s mantle, high-temperature nitrogen geochemistry, and the fundamental relationships between mantle processes and atmospheric chemistry on Earth, Mars and Venus.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

The EAG promotes geochemical research and equality within geochemistry (gender, ethnicity, and nationality). As a person of mixed ethnicity, I appreciate (first-hand) that achieving equality requires a community-driven effort. As councillor I will work with the EAG council and broader membership to improve representation from each and every demographic in EAG’s activities. Finally, my own experience to date has shown me that no one can go alone. I am extremely grateful to the selfless support I have received from a number of my fellow geochemists over the past decade, and I am firmly of the opinion that without their support, their time, and their tutorship, I wouldn’t be where I am today. In short, I want to give back to the community that has given me so much.

Carsten Münker, University of Cologne, Germany
Biography

Carsten Münker is professor for geochemistry and cosmochemistry at University of Cologne, Germany, since 2009. He has done his PhD research in the 1990s at Göttingen University and MPI Mainz and has carried out his postdoctoral research at the universities of Tasmania (Australia) and Münster (Germany), followed by a professorship for geochemistry at Bonn University. Carsten’s research focuses on the application of novel isotope and trace element tools to problems in geochemistry and cosmochemistry, with an emphasis on high temperature processes. In 2015, he has been awarded an ERC Advanced Grant to investigate the isotope vestige of meteorites and Earth’s oldest rocks. He also co-ordinates a German key research program on early earth habitability.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

My major motivations to serve as EAG councillor are to help bringing together different fields of geochemistry in Europe and to help promoting careers of young scientists. Europe hosts strong research groups in geochemistry, yet joint activities are not as co-ordinated and visible as in northern America. Being involved as committee member for various Goldschmidt meetings and co-ordinated research programs, I learned that it is important to (i) bring together different fields of geochemical research by promoting innovative conference sessions or workshops (ii) provide more platforms and opportunities for young researchers, and (iii) support scientific mobility by improving networking and funding opportunities.

Emily Pope, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Biography

Emily Pope is an Assistant Professor at the Natural History Museum of Denmark, within the University of Copenhagen. She obtained her undergraduate degree from Colorado College in 2004, her PhD from Stanford University in 2011, and carried out her postdoctoral research as a member of the Nordic Center for Earth Evolution (NordCEE) at the University of Copenhagen. In her current research, Emily uses stable isotope chemistry to investigate the evolution of early Earth and life, most recently focusing on the isotopic and physical evolution of the Precambrian hydrosphere. More broadly, Emily is interested in the role of fluids in high-temperature geological processes, and has used oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopes to better understand active geothermal systems, ore-forming processes and fluid flux between Earth’s surface and mantle. Emily is also a member of the Iceland Deep Drilling Project, a consortium whose objective is to evaluate the utility of supercritical geothermal fluids in Iceland as an energy resource.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

I would like to be a member of the EAG council because I could give back to a society from which I have benefited. I could be an asset to the organization by sharing perspectives of an early career professor, and the experiences I’ve gained from public outreach and education while employed at the Natural History Museum of Denmark. As an early career scientist with an educational background in the United States, developing a research network in Europe, gaining familiarity with European research groups, and navigating funding opportunities and award systems is challenging. The meetings, publications and programs that EAG supports are invaluable to those beginning their career. If elected, I look forward to contributing to those programs that have helped me, and developing new opportunities that support and encourage young scientists from diverse backgrounds.

Jan Wiederhold, University of Vienna, Austria
Biography

Jan Wiederhold first obtained a Diploma in Geoecology (University of Karlsruhe, Germany) and a Master in Soil Science (Fulbright Scholar at Oregon State University, USA). For his PhD in Soil Chemistry and Isotope Geochemistry (ETH Zurich, Switzerland) on iron isotopes in soils he received the “ETH medal”. Last year, he completed the “habilitation” in environmental geochemistry at ETH Zurich to which he is still affiliated as private lecturer. Now based in the Department of Environmental Geosciences at the University of Vienna (Austria), his current research is aimed at developing and applying metal stable isotope signatures as novel tracers in environmental studies, with a particular focus on mercury cycling in natural and contaminated ecosystems. As lead organizer of the “EnvironMetal Isotopes 2013” conference in Ascona (CH) he received financial support from the EAG. Since 2012, he serves as Associate Editor for Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

As a geochemist working at the interface of earth sciences and environmental sciences, I am especially aware of the need for good communication and interdisciplinary exchange between scientists with different backgrounds. In my view, the EAG has done groundbreaking work to connect and support geochemists in Europe and beyond through its various programs and activities, probably most visible in the organization of the European Goldschmidt conferences. I feel honored to stand for election to the EAG council and would be glad to contribute where needed. I would be particularly interested in getting involved in the current endeavors to promote the transition to open-access journals, but also in the organization of events and support for early-career scientists.

Jutta Zipfel, Senckenberg Research Institute, Germany
Biography

Jutta Zipfel is Curator of the Meteorite Collection at the Senckenberg Forschungsinstitut und Naturmuseum Frankfurt (Germany). She studied Geology at the Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, obtained her PhD in 1994, and has carried out postdoctoral research at the University of California, San Diego. From 1997 to 2005 she was appointed Research Assistant in the Abteilung Kosmochemie of the Max Planck Institut für Chemie in Mainz (Germany). Her research interests focuses on petrologic and geochemical studies of meteorites. In particular, she is interested in deciphering processes related to alteration of primitive solar system materials, and to the thermal and chemical evolution of minor bodies. In 2012, Jutta was elected Fellow of the Meteoritical Society. The asteroid (7565) Zipfel is named after her.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

My major interest in serving as a councillor is to support EAG in promoting geochemistry as an integral part of the scientific community, and in creating opportunities for scientific networking. If elected, I would seek to contribute to the association in ways that would strengthen EAG supported programs, such as conferences and short courses. These are ideal platforms for promoting ideas and concepts of geochemistry of wide scope. I would think of ways to initiate stronger networking over the different sub-fields in geochemistry, and of ways how to effectively integrate and encourage young scientists.

Election of Councillors by the EAG Council

In September 2016, the Council has elected Sigurður Reynir Gíslason as EAG Vice-President, starting in January 2017.

Sigurður (Siggi) Reynir Gíslason received his PhD in geochemistry from the Johns Hopkins University, under the supervision of Hans P. Eugster. He is a Research Professor at the Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland. He is the chairman of CarbFix (carbfix.com), the initiative to store carbon in basaltic rocks. Siggi’s major scientific contributions are: 1) measurement of the dissolution rates and dissolution mechanisms of volcanic glasses as a function of glass composition, aqueous solution composition and temperature, 2) field and laboratory experiments related to mineral storage of CO2 in basaltic rocks, 3) quantifying the chemical/physical erosion rates of basaltic terrains and their contribution to the global carbon cycle and 4) measuring the environmental effects of volcanic eruptions.

Additional information can be found here.

Elections of the EAG Council 2016

Election of Councillors by EAG Members

The Council Elections 2016 took place from from 27 October until 11 November 2015. 1081 votes were cast by EAG members, representing a turnout of 37%.
Donald E. Canfield (University of Southern Denmark), Kirsten Küsel (Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany) and Helen Williams (Durham University, UK) were elected.

Candidates for the elections of the EAG Council 2016:

Don Canfield, University of Southern Denmark
Biography

Donald E. Canfield received his PhD in geochemistry from Yale University, under the supervision of Robert A. Berner. Currently, Canfield is Prof. of Ecology at the University of Southern Denmark and Director of the Nordic Center for Earth Evolution (NordCEE). Canfield uses the study of modern microbes and microbial ecosystems to understand the evolution of Earth surface chemistry and biology through time. Canfield is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences. He has authored “Oxygen, a Four Billion Year History”, co-authored “Aquatic Geomicrobiology”, has co-edited “Fundamentals of Geobiology”, while also editing the newly translated “Bass Becking’s Geobiology”. Canfield is an editor for the journals PNAS, Geobiology, and the American Journal of Science, and has served the ERC as an Advanced Grant panel member.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

These are exciting times in geochemistry. The field is growing rapidly, both in terms of the numbers of practicing geochemist and the avenues of inquiry. EAG has been both innovative and extremely proactive in establishing highly visible platforms for revealing the breadth of geochemistry as a field, and for highlighting important scientific progress. Thus, I believe that initiatives such as “Elements” and “Geochemical Perspectives” provide great service to EAG members, the geochemical community, and provide broad visibility for geochemical science. Furthermore, the new journal “Geochemical Perspectives Letters” is visionary as a platform for rapid and inexpensive quality open access publication. I would like to help continue this momentum and to be involved in making EAG and even more dynamic and visible professional society.

Kirsten Küsel, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany
Biography

Kirsten Küsel is Professor for Aquatic Geomicrobiology at the Institute of Ecology of the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany. She studied Geoecology at the University of Bayreuth, obtained her PhD in 1995 in Microbiology at the Bayreuth Institute for Terrestrial Ecosystem Science, and was appointed as Associate Professor for Limnology in 2004. Since 2011 she has also been co-director of the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig. Due to her interdisciplinary background, the research of her group encompasses studies of microbe-mineral interactions, subsurface microbiology and element cycling in aquatic environments. She has always been interested in the elucidation of physical or chemical properties which dictate or at least affect the life of microbes to shed light on geochemical changes mediated by microbial activities.
More information about Kirsten and her group can be found at www.geomicrobiology.de.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

As a geomicrobiologist I especially love the Goldschmidt conference which provides a home for scientists like me moving between and bridging different disciplines. The spirit of the EAG always promotes interdisciplinary interactions that are reflected by the topics launched in the high ranking journal Geochemical Perspectives which helped to increase our international visibility. I am eager to help contribute to these efforts.

Frédéric Moynier, IPGP & University of Paris Diderot France
Biography

Frédéric Moynier is Professor in Isotope Geochemistry at the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris and the University of Paris Diderot. He obtained his PhD at ENS Lyon in 2006 working on the Ni, Zn, and Cu isotopic composition of meteorites, and he continued with a post-doc position at UC Davis from 2006 to 2007. From 2008 to 2013 he was Assistant and then Associate Professor at Washington University in St Louis. He is the recipient of the EAG Houtermans Award (2012), the Meteoritical Society Nier Prize (2012), and the AGU Kuno Award (2013), and he has served as Associate Editor for GCA since 2010. His main scientific interests focus on the origin and evolution of the terrestrial planets, the source of volatile elements in the inner Solar System, and the differentiation and the early history of the Earth. He is also interested in studying the isotopic fractionation associated with the speciation of metals in aqueous systems by coupling theoretical and experimental approaches.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

The EAG plays a major role in promoting European geochemistry and furthering innovative scientific research. I have been particularly impressed by the recent efforts of the new publications (Geochemical Perspectives and Geochemical Perspectives Letters) and by the outreach centered on European geochemical work, and I think this is a direction that the society should push even further. As an EAG councillor, I look forward to help promote geochemistry in Europe and to work to increase the number of members of the society. The success of our community lies in international collaboration and education, so I believe that training and financial aid to students and early career scientists, especially support to attend the Goldschmidt conferences, is central to our society.

Sophie Opfergelt, Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium
Biography

Sophie Opfergelt is a FNRS permanent researcher and professor at the Earth and Life Institute at the Université catholique de Louvain (UCL) in Belgium. She holds a MSc in Geology (UCL, 2002). After working as a mine geologist in Mali (2002-2003), she completed a PhD at UCL in 2008. This was followed by two postdoctoral stays at the University of Oxford, UK (2009-2010) and UCL (2011-2014). Her research combines stable isotope geochemistry (Si, Mg) with soil science to improve the understanding of the Earth’s surface processes controlling chemical weathering and element export from the continent. She was awarded the IAGC Ebelmen Award in 2014 and she serves as a council member of IAGC (2015-2016).

Motivation for serving the EAG council

Non-traditional stable isotope geochemistry is a blooming research field spreading across various disciplines. Novel research opportunities will be generated by stimulating interactions within the scientific community. This not only requires passionate scientists but also concrete initiatives to improve support. This is particularly critical for early career researchers who often face the dual challenge of building a successful career and raising a young family. Over the last 11 years, EAG’s actions such as Goldschmidt, Elements, the mentor program, Geochemical Perspectives, or recently Geochemical Perspectives Letters, have strongly inspired and facilitated my research. As an elected EAG council member, I will do my best to contribute and develop further means to foster efficient networking including among young scientists.

Ronny Schönberg, University of Tübingen, Germany
Biography

Ronny Schönberg is Professor for Isotope Geochemistry at the University of Tübingen (Germany) since 2010. He obtained his PhD in Philosophy and Sciences at the Department of Geology in Bern (Switzerland) in 2000 using Re-Os isotope systematics in chromite ores of layered intrusions to investigate their source and formation processes. He worked as postdoctoral researcher at the University of Queensland (Australia; 2000-2002) – mainly working with extinct radiogenic systems in meteorites (182Hf-182W), at the University of Hannover (Germany; 2002 2008) and the Centre for Geobiology at the University of Bergen (Norway; 2008-2010) where he specialized on the use of stable Fe and Cr isotope systematics in high- and low-temperature environments. At the moment, his main research focus is the use of transition metal (Cr-Fe-Cu-Zn-Mo) and traditional (C-O-S) stable isotope variations in chemical sediments to investigate significant changes in the redox-state of Earth’s atmosphere and oceans through time.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

During the last decade Geochemistry has been a quickly growing community with strongly increasing numbers of attendees at international conferences. I would like to contribute to further support and promote Geochemistry within the field of Earth Sciences in and beyond Europe by actively participate in EAG’s council and various commissions handling the organization of the Goldschmidt Meeting, EAG publications, awards, outreach events and newsletters. I am particularly enthusiastic about further promoting our research field amongst students and young scientists and being a strong supporter of gender equality EAG’s Council would provide me with an ideal platform regarding these issues. Being elected as a member of the EAG council would also allow me to help identify and support new future research directions within Geochemistry.

Helen Williams, Durham University, UK
Biography

Helen Williams is a Reader at the Department of Earth Sciences of Durham University, UK. She obtained her undergraduate degree from the University of Cambridge and her PhD from the Open University, and has carried out postdoctoral research at ETH Zurich and Macquarie University. In 2008 she was awarded a NERC Fellowship at the University of Oxford and she moved to Durham University in 2011. Helen’s research interests center around the application of non-traditional stable isotopes to understanding the formation and evolution of planetary interiors and in 2012 she was awarded an ERC Starting Grant to support this research. She is also collaborating on a number projects using non-traditional stable isotopes to explore weathering processes and biogeochemical cycling and she is keen to further expand on research interests and applications of non-traditional stable isotope systems in the future.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

I am passionate about promoting geochemistry and geochemists internationally, and I am particularly keen to find ways to promote and support young and early-career scientists in the highly competitive international environment. The EAG is the leading forum in Europe for enhancing and promoting geochemistry, and I would be delighted to have the opportunity to contribute towards these goals. I have been fortunate in my career to have benefited from ERC funding and fellowship opportunities and I would be particularly interested in exploring future roles that the EAG could play in supporting young and early-career scientists in these ways.

Election of Councillors by the EAG Council

The EAG Council has re-elected Andreas Kappler (University of Tübingen, Germany) as EAG Secretary.
Andreas Kappler is currently professor of Geomicrobiology at the Center for Applied Geosciences of the University of Tübingen in Germany. He received his PhD in 2000 from University of Konstanz (Germany) in Microbiology and had postdoc positions at the ETH Zürich/EAWAG (2000-2002) in Environmental Chemistry and at the California Institute of Technology (2002-2004) in Geobiology.
Andreas Kappler is Associate Editor of PALAIOS and on the editorial board of GEOBIOLOGY.
His main area of interest focuses on iron geomicrobiology, cell-mineral interactions, and degradation and transformation of pollutants.
More information and a list of publications can be found here.

Elections of the EAG Council 2015

Election of Councillors by EAG Members

The Council Elections 2015 took place from from 13 October until 27 October 2014. 781 votes were cast by EAG members, representing a turnout of 30%. Sigurður Reynir Gíslason (University of Iceland), Andreas Pack (University of Göttingen) and Dominik Weiss (Imperial College London) were elected.

Candidates for the elections of the EAG Council 2015:

Thilo Behrends, Utrecht University, Netherlands

Biography

Thilo Behrends is Assistant Professor at Utrecht University in the Netherlands. He studied Geoecology at the University of Bayreuth and received his PhD in Hydrology at the same university, in which he determined the effect of surfactants on the phase distribution of aromatic compounds. Since 2000, he has been working in the Geochemistry group at the Department of Earth Sciences, Utrecht University, the Netherlands. First he was employed as a Postdoc and later as a Research Officer before becoming Assistant Professor. His research interest focuses on redox transformations of metals in natural and contaminated environments. Most of his research is experimentally based and targets microbial as well as non-biotic redox pathways and their impact on the behaviour of nutrients and contaminants. From 2006 to 2009 he has served as an Associated Editor of the Geochemical News. He is a board member of the Dutch working group which unified the activities of environmentally orientated sections of the Dutch Chemical and Toxicological Societies.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

‘The EAG plays an important role in disseminating news, creating networks and facilitating scientific exchange and collaborations between geochemists. I am convinced that contributing to achieving these goals is a rewarding task. As a councillor, I would be particularly interested in exploring what role the EAG could play in a) increasing the success of geochemists in receiving funding from the Horizon 2020 programme and b) creating a bridge between geochemists working in academia and those who are active in the private sector.’

Sigurður Reynir Gíslason, University of Iceland

Biography

Sigurður (Siggi) Reynir Gíslason is a Research Professor at the Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland. He is the chairman of CarbFix (carbfix.com), the initiative to store carbon in basaltic rocks. Siggi’s major scientific contributions are: 1) measurement of the dissolution rates and dissolution mechanisms of volcanic glasses as a function of glass composition, aqueous solution composition and temperature, 2) field and laboratory experiments related to mineral storage of CO2 in basaltic rocks, 3) quantifying the chemical/physical erosion rates of basaltic terrains and their contribution to the global carbon cycle and 4) measuring the environmental effects of volcanic eruptions, including the current one in Bárðarbunga, Iceland.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

‘I got my PhD from Johns Hopkins University, USA in 1985 and returned back to Iceland shortly after that. I experienced the “birth“ of the EAG and the Goldschmidt conferences and I have served on various committees of the EAG, the Geochemical Society and the International Association of GeoChemistry. I have watched with admiration the growing strength of the EAG over the past decade; the Goldschmidt Conference, Geochemical Perspectives and now to come, Geochemical Perspective Letters. I would like the association to continue on this path, and do my best to help.’

Andreas Pack, University of Göttingen, Germany

Biography

Andreas Pack is Professor for Isotope Geology at the University of Göttingen (Germany). He obtained his PhD in Natural Sciences (“rerum naturalium”) at the University of Bonn in 2000 on oxide inclusions in steel. He worked as PostDoc at the Universities of New Mexico (USA), Cologne (Germany), Nancy (France), and Hannover (Germany). In Hannover, he led a DFG funded Emmy-Noether-Research Group in cosmochemistry. In Göttingen, he works on topics in geo- and cosmochemistry, atmospheric science, experimental petrology, and applied mineralogy. One of his current focuses is on triple oxygen isotope variations in lunar and terrestrial rocks. More information is available online.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

‘I regard the EAG as an important institution for representing the geo- and cosmochemistry community on EU level, e.g. in order to keep the community internationally competitive with respect of costly large-scale analytical facilities. Also, I want to support the EAG activities with respect to supporting young scientists and on topics related to the future of scientific publishing.’

Mihály Pósfai, University of Pannonia, Hungary

Biography

Mihály Pósfai is a professor at the University of Pannonia in Veszprém, Hungary. He obtained his PhD at Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, then continued as a postdoc at Arizona State University, specializing in transmission electron microscope studies of nanoscale phenomena related to environmental mineralogy problems. His current research interests include biomineralization and biomimetic synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles and the properties and climate effects of individual atmospheric particles. More information and a list of publications can be found here.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

‘Goldschmidt meetings are special: the atmosphere is vibrant with the excitement of gaining new knowledge across a wide range of disciplines. I would be delighted to serve a society that organizes such meetings and maintains efficient channels of communication among researchers in different fields. If elected, I will contribute to the planning of conferences, publications, short courses and other EAG activities.’

Simon Poulton, University of Leeds, UK

Biography

Simon Poulton is Professor of Biogeochemistry and Earth History in the School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, UK. He obtained his PhD at the University of Leeds in 1999 and subsequently held Marie Curie and NERC Fellowships at the University of Southern Denmark, Bristol University and Newcastle University. After six years on the faculty at Newcastle he returned to Leeds in 2012, where he is now Director of the Earth Surface Science Institute. His research is aimed at understanding major periods of environmental change in deep time, incorporating studies of modern redox-sensitive environments, experimental evaluation of key (bio)geochemical processes, and geochemical and isotopic analyses of ancient rocks.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

‘I feel passionately about promoting all fields of geochemistry, from research through to teaching, networking and outreach, across Europe and beyond. EAG is the leading forum in Europe for enhancing and promoting geochemistry, and I would relish the opportunity to provide vision and commitment to this role. As a consequence of a broad geochemical background, I am particularly keen to fully develop the potential of all branches of geochemistry on the international stage.’

Dominik Weiss, Imperial College London, UK

Biography

Dominik Weiss is a Reader in Environmental Geochemistry at Imperial College London. He read Natural Sciences at the ETH Zurich with majors in Analytical and Inorganic Chemistry. Following a stage as research associate at the Weizmann Institute of Science, he pursuit his PhD studies in Geochemistry working on the atmospheric cycling of lead at the University of Bern. After postdoctoral work at MIT studying the marine Pb cycle, he was appointed as faculty member at Imperial College London, first as Lecturer, then as Senior Lecturer and since 2012 as Reader. His main research interests center around the role and chemistry of metals in the environment. He was a Cox Visiting Professor at Stanford University in 2013 and serves as associate editor with Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta. He has authored and co authored more than 90 research articles and has one patent to his name.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

‘The areas were I would like to serve are varied and I am ultimately very open and happy to take on any vacant that needs a new councilor. Probably mostly I would be interested joining the Science Innnovation Award presented to scientists who have made an important and innovative breakthrough in geochemistry. This is partly because Werner Stumm has actually taught me and his work left a major impact on me. Another area of great interest would be to promote external reactions with other professional societies. I understand a historical Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) has recently been signed with the US Geochemical Society and I would love to extend close relationships with the major Chemical Societies in Europe and worldwide.’

Election of Councillors by the EAG Council

The council has elected Bernard Marty (CRPG Nancy) as Vice-President, Antje Boetius (HGF-MPG Group for Deep Sea Ecology and Technology, Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research and Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology) as a new Goldschmidt Officer and Stefanie Lutz (University of Leeds) as the first Early Career Councillor.

Elections of the EAG Council 2014

Election of Councillors by EAG Members

The Council Elections 2014 took place from Monday 21 October until Monday 4 November 2013. 1040 votes were cast by EAG members, representing a turnout of 38%. Karim Benzerara and Ruben Kretzschmar were elected.

Candidates for the elections of the EAG Council 2014:

Karim Benzerara, University Pierre et Marie Curie, France

Biography

Karim Benzerara is a CNRS Research Director at the Institut de Minéralogie et de Physique des Milieux Condensés in University Pierre et Marie Curie, France.
He obtained his PhD in Geochemistry in 2002 at the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris on the terrestrial alteration of a meteorite. He was a postdoc in Stanford University with G.E Brown, where he conducted synchrotron studies of microbe-mineral interactions. His main research interests include biomineralization, search for ancient traces of life and geochemistry of carbon. He is a consolidator ERC grant holder on carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria.
More information and a list of publications can be found here.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

EAG organizes Goldschmidt meetings in Europe, bestows awards and since recently has started a range of new initiatives such as publication of Geochemical Perspectives or the organization of a Distinguished Lecture Program. It has therefore become a very important association for our community. My decision to run for the elections came very naturally from the deep desire to give back to the EAG what it offered to me in the recent past. I want to contribute to its development and serve as a restless ambassador for our association. I will take all responsibilities of a councillor, including attending all meetings of the committee with the aim of helping our association to grow further and better.

Dominik Hezel, University of Cologne, Germany

Biography

Dominik Hezel is an Assistant Professor (Akademischer Rat) for Cosmochemistry and Geochemistry at the Institute for Geology and Mineralogy at the University of Cologne, Germany, since 2011. He obtained his diploma in 2000 in Heidelberg with a thesis about light elements in tourmalines from pegmatites of Ikaria, Greece. In 2003, he gained his PhD in Cologne about element fractionation processes in the solar nebula. After two more years as a scientific assistant he moved to the Natural History Museum, London, as a researcher meteorites and stayed there for 5 years. The fantastic meteorite collection at the NHM allowed for broad studies in cosmochemistry. A focus was isotope cosmochemistry and in particular advancing and promoting tomography as a new tool, which culminated in a GCA special issue on 3D structures in meteorites. Dominik has a broad interest in cosmochemistry, but also in high temperature geochemistry and petrology.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

The EAG is an essential institution to promote, organise and represent the broad field of geochemical and cosmochemical research in Europe. This is visible to the scientific community in form of the Goldschmidt conference and EAG publications. In addition, the EAG is important as a representative to communicate the community’s interest e.g. towards decision makers in funding agencies as well as science policy. As a member of the EAG council I would be happy to dedicate all the necessary time to achieve these goals.
I would be in particular interested in increasing the visibility of cosmochemistry and how to address the challenge of the exponential growth of geochemical data.

Hans Keppler, University of Bayreuth, Germany

Biography

Hans Keppler is a professor at Bayerisches Geoinstitut in Bayreuth. After studying mineralogy and chemistry at the University of Karlsruhe, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the California Institute of Technology. His research interests include, among others, the origin and fate of Earth´s volatiles, experimental studies on the properties of fluids and silicate melt at high pressures and temperatures, chemical transport in subduction zones and magmatic hydrothermal systems.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

EAG could play an important role in enhancing cooperation of geochemists across all of Europe, including in particular the new EU member states. Geochemistry would very much benefit from open access to major analytical and experimental facilities as well as from short courses and exchange opportunities for young scientists.

Ruben Kretzschmar, ETH Zurich, Switzerland

Biography

Ruben Kretzschmar is Professor of Soil Chemistry in the Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics at ETH Zurich, Switzerland. Ruben earned his Ph.D. degree in 1994 at North Carolina State University, Raleigh, where he specialized in soil chemistry and mineralogy. He was elected Associate Professor at ETH Zurich in 1999 and Full Professor in 2002. From August 2008 to July 2009 he was a Cox Visiting Professor in the Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences at Stanford University, CA, USA. The research of his group is concerned with the biogeochemical behavior and cycling of trace elements in the environment. Ruben was associate editor of Environmental Science & Technology from 2008 to 2013, and he has authored or co-authored more than 140 research articles and several reviews and book chapters. More information about Ruben and his group is available here.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

I would like to serve the EAG Council, because I value EAG as the most effective organization promoting science, education, and networking of geochemists in Europe. I am especially interested in activities supporting the training and networking of PhD students and young postdocs. If elected, I would also contribute to the planning of future EAG activities, such as Goldschmidt conferences, short courses, and publications.

Elections of the EAG Council 2013

Election of Councillors by EAG Members

The Council Elections 2014 took place from Monday 29 October until Monday 12 November 2012. 449 votes were cast by EAG members, representing a turnout of 26%. Britta Planer-Friedrich (University of Bayreuth, Germany), Maria Schönbächler (ETH Zürich, Switzerland) and Nathalie Vigier (CRPG Nancy, France)were elected.

Candidates for the elections of the EAG Council 2013:

High-Temperature Geochemistry

John Rudge, University of Cambridge, UK

Biography

Most of my career has been spent at the University of Cambridge, where I am now a lecturer in the Department of Earth Sciences (appointed in 2010). As a postdoc I spent time at ETH Zürich, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, and Yale University. My main research interests lie at the theoretical end of Solid Earth isotope geochemistry, and I have been involved in modelling work on a diverse range of topics, including Earth’s accretion and core formation, the stirring and mixing of isotopic tracers in the mantle, and the optimisation of the double spike technique in mass spectrometry.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

As a regular attender of the Goldschmidt meetings, and as a contributor and reader of Elements magazine, I feel I have benefited greatly from the work of the EAG. I would like the opportunity to give something back to EAG, to ensure the continued success of both the Goldschmidt meeting and the EAG publications.

Maria Schönbächler, ETH Zürich, Switzerland

Biography

Maria Schönbächler is an associate professor in Isotope Geochemistry at the ETH Zürich, Switzerland. She is particularly interested in the formation, differentiation and early evolution of the Earth and other planetary bodies. Her research is orientated towards chronology, stable isotope fractionation of non-traditional elements and the development of new techniques for high-precision isotope analyses of geological materials. She received her PhD from ETH Zürich, followed by postdoctoral positions at the Carnegie Institution of Washington and Imperial College London. She was appointed a Lecturer position at the University of Manchester in 2007 and moved to Zürich in 2012.

Motivation for serving the EAG councilThe EAG plays an important role in promoting geochemistry in Europe. The association made the Goldschmidt conference a great success and has also initiated exciting new projects such as the journal Geochemical Perspectives to catch in-depth views of specific geochemical topics and the Distinguished Lecture Program to further promote geochemistry. I have benefited from these efforts and in return I would like to serve the association and help EAG to advocate geochemistry and in particular to advance opportunities for interaction and knowledge exchange between geochemists.


Low-Temperature Geochemistry

Paul Dennis, University of East Anglia, UK

Biography

I am currently Head of the Stable Isotope Geochemistry Laboratories of the School of Environmental Sciences at the University of East Anglia where I also teach courses in geochemistry and geology. In a career that spans more than 30 years my research using stable isotopes has ranged from high temperature oxygen transport properties of minerals through to low temperature, earth surface, oceanic and atmospheric processes. My current research focusses on the application of clumped isotope geochemistry to help understand Earth surface temperatures through time, low temperature MVT type mineralisation and fluid-rock interactions, and the origin and transport of geofluids.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

I am passionate about excellence in geochemical research and the relevance and importance of geochemistry to informing decisions society needs to make in order to sustain future growth and the preservation of the environment. Being on the council of the EAG I will bring energy and enthusiasm in support of the full range of the associations activities with special interest in the promotion of geochemistry as a profession, and nurturing the next generation of geochemists through conference, education and outreach activities.

Nathalie Vigier, CRPG Nancy, France

Biography

I obtained my PhD in Dec. 2000, in Isotope Geochemistry, at the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP, Université Paris VII, France). After a two years post-doc (Marie Curie) at the Open University (UK), I was recruited to join CRPG (Centre de Recherches Pétrographiques et Géochimiques) in Nancy, as a CNRS Researcher. My main fields of research include the study of continental chemical and physical erosion, clay formation, carbon cycle and paleoenvironments. Most recently my main contributions concern the understanding of the isotope geochemistry of Li and Mg in low temperature systems, studying both biotic and abiotic systems. To date I have published 31 papers, I am part of the Scientific Technology Panel of IODP and have been co-convenior of several sessions at the Goldschmidt Conference, EGU and AGU Conferences.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

With the growing impact of the Goldschmidt Conference with each passing year, I feel that favoring interactions between geochemists from different fields and generations is essential to the development of new tools, of new ideas, and benefit to multidisciplinary approaches. As EAG is an essential instrument for organizing the geochemical community in Europe, I’d be very interested to play an active role in the initiatives and decisions of its council, encouraging the continued growth and diversification of Geochemistry.


Biogeochemistry

Karim Benzerara, University Pierre et Marie Curie, France

Biography

Karim Benzerara is a CNRS Research Director at the Institut de Minéralogie et de Physique des Milieux Condensés in University Pierre et Marie Curie, France. He obtained his PhD in 2002 in basics and applied Geochemistry at the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP) under the supervision of F. Guyot on the terrestrial and biological alteration of a meteorite. This was followed by two years of Postdoc in Stanford University in G.E Brown’s group, where he conducted synchrotron studies of microbe-mineral interactions. He was hired by the CNRS in 2004 and promoted to Research Director in 2012. His main research interests include Biomineralization, Search for traces of ancient life or low-T geochemistry. More information and a list of publications can be found here.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

I decided to run for the elections of new council members of the EAG. EAG organizes Goldschmidt meetings in Europe, bestows awards and since recently has started a range of new initiatives such as publication of Geochemical Perspectives or organization of distinguished lecture program. The role of council members is to oversee and guide the development of the society, contribute to the different initiatives mentioned above and serve as ambassadors of our association. By running for the elections, I promise to take all responsibilities of a councillor, including attending all meetings of the committee with the aim of helping our association to grow further and better. My decision to run for the elections came very naturally from the desire to give back to the EAG what I was offered in the recent past (as a former recipient of the Houtermans Award and a former distinguished Lecturer). My background in biogeochemistry and mineralogy will help me to contribute to the developments of EAG initiatives in those fields but I will commit to the broader range of fields covered by EAG.

Britta Planer-Friedrich, University of Bayreuth, Germany

Biography

A geologist by training (master in 2000), I received my PhD in hydrogeology and environmental geochemistry in 2004 from the Bergakademie Freiberg, Germany. After postdoctoral research stays in the UK and Canada with a focus on analytical chemistry, I started as Assistant Professor for environmental geochemistry and leader of an Emmy Noether Young Researcher Group from the German Research Foundation at the University Bayreuth, Germany and was appointed Associate Professor in February 2012. My research interest is in the field of biogeochemistry, specifically in understanding abiotic and microbially catalyzed processes that control the mobility, uptake in the biosphere and toxicity of aqueous and volatile trace elements in suboxic to anoxic environments. Extreme environments such as geothermal or hypersaline sites are one focus of my studies.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

Strengthening the visibility of biogeochemical research within Europe and internationally is one of my motivations to serve the EAG council. To help facilitate communication within the community I will happily engage myself in EAG´s publications Elements and Geochemical Perspectives. The Goldschmidt conferences have provided me personally with excellent opportunities for exchange with other environmental geochemists. The increasing number of participants proves their general popularity and standing within the community. As a member of the EAG council I´d be honored to assist in organizing Goldschmidt meetings in Europe. High on my agenda will be the promotion of alternative conference formats, such as discussions session on “hot topics”, special workshops for young scientists, or open space workshops as kick-off platforms for larger European or international research initiatives.

Elections of the EAG Council 2012

Election of Councillors by EAG Members

The Council Elections 2012 took place from Monday 17 October until Monday 31 October 2011. 465 votes were cast by EAG members, representing a turnout of 30%.Michael Bau (Jacobs University, Bremen, Germany), Vinciane Debaille (University of Brussels, Belgium) and Amaelle Landais (CNRS Paris, France) were elected.

Candidates for the elections of the EAG Council 2012:

Michael Bau, Jacobs University, Bremen, GermanyBiography

After having graduated in Geology from RWTH Aachen, Germany, I joined the Hahn-Meitner-Institute, West-Berlin (1989-1992; Dr. rer. nat. degree in Geochemistry from Free University Berlin in 1991). I worked as a Research Associate at GFZ Potsdam, Germany (1993-1998), and at the NASA Penn State Astrobiology Research Institute, USA (1999-2002). Since 2003, I am Professor of Geoscience at Jacobs University Bremen, Germany, in the programs “Earth and Space Sciences” and “Integrated Environmental Studies”. My main research interests are low-temperature geochemistry and the evolution of biogeochemical trace element cycles throughout Earth’s history from the Early Archean to Today.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

I believe that in order to be widely recognized (in particular at the EU level) as one of the core disciplines addressing environmental and resource issues, Geochemistry has to develop a prominent profile. This requires a joint European effort that I feel could be organized and spearheaded by the EAG. Moreover, I think that there is strong need for more inter-European knowledge transfer which could also be promoted by the EAG. Getting actively involved in these tasks via the EAG is an exciting and rewarding challenge.

Michael Böttcher, Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research, Warnemünde and EMA University of Greifswald, Germany

Biography

After studies of mineralogy at the University of Hamburg, I graduated at the University of Göttingen, Germany, in 1989, where I also received my Dr.rer.nat degree (1993). Postdoc studies at the ICBM of the University of Oldenburg were followed by a research scientist position at the Max-Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen until 2005. In 2003, I finished my habilitation and received the venia legendi for ‘Geochemistry’ at the University of Oldenburg. Since 2006, I am Professor for Marine Geochemistry at the University of Greifswald, head of the Geochemistry & Isotope Geochemistry Group, and vice-head of the Marine Geology Section at the Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research (IOW) in Warnemünde, Germany. My research interests focus on the biological impact on low-temperature biogeochemical element cycles on different scales, water-rock disequilibrium systems, and the processes controlling the partitioning of stable isotopes.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

Bringing geochemical knowledge into society is one of the important current and future activities of EAG. Most if not all current environment, energy and resource-related debates, for instance, require a solid (bio)geochemical expertise. This demands the consideration of geochemical concepts in the whole educational system, as a further investment into the future. EAG is the European platform for an increasing public outreach of geochemical aspects and the exchange with other geochemical communities worldwide. Starting in 2004, I continuously (co)organized a session for the yearly EGU meetings and served as convener for several Goldschmidt conferences. I am interested in extending my personal activities for the development of EAG and the encouragement of broader interest in biogeochemistry.

Vincianne Debaille, University of Brussels, Belgium

Biography

I got my PhD degree in isotope geochemistry in 2005 at the Université Blaise Pascal (Clermont-Ferrand, France). After two years of postdoctoral fellowship at the Lunar and Planetary Institute (Houston, USA), I came back in Brussels for a three-year post-doc, and since 2010, I am now FNRS Research Associate at the Université Libre de Bruxelles (Brussels, Belgium). As a geochemist, I am interested in studying early differentiation processes of terrestrial planets such as Mars or the Earth, and formation, chronology and subsequent mixing of chemically distinct reservoirs.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

For almost the ten last years, I have benefited from the Goldschmidt conference organization and other recent initiatives such as the Elements journal thanks to the EAG. Now I am really motivated to contribute personally to the association and bring my own perspective as a young scientist to promote geochemistry in Europe and help in turn many other geochemists to benefit from the EAG.

Martin Elsner, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Germany

Biography

My research investigates environmental transformation of organic compounds – most prominently groundwater contaminants – with compound-specific isotope analysis. I received my diploma in chemistry at ETH Zürich (1998) and obtained my Ph.D. in the Schwarzenbach group, EAWAG (2003). After a postdoctoral stay with Barbara Sherwood Lollar at the University of Toronto (2004-05) I have been heading my own research group at the Helmholtz Zentrum München, in affiliation with the Department of Geosciences, University of Tübingen (Habilitation 2011).

Motivation for serving the EAG council

My aim is to give something back and play an active part in the EAG council. In the past two years, I have been a member of the EAG Program Committee and have organized the EAG social event at the EGU annual meeting in Vienna. Now I would like contribute to the EAG initiatives and the Goldschmidt conference. My aim is to strengthen the visibility of research about environmental organic compounds and their transformation mechanisms. I would like to represent this important research direction and contribute with dedicated workshops and in thematic sessions.

Albert Galy, University of Cambridge, UK

Biography

Albert Galy is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge. Research interests include isotope geochemistry, with application to the geological carbon cycle, erosion, paleoclimate, and the early solar system. M.S. and Ph.D. in geology at Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine, Nancy; postdoctorate at the University of Oxford (1999–2000); assistant Lecturer at the University of Cambridge (2000–2003); Lecturer, Cambridge (2003-2007); Senior Lecturer, Cambridge (2007 to present).

Motivation for serving the EAG council

EAG is an extremely important professional organization that sponsors essential meetings, and emphasizes in the promotion of geochemistry among students. With the launch of new initiatives such as the journal Geochemical Perspectives or the Distinguished Lecture Program and the expansion of its membership, the Association is on a bright but steep trajectory. I would like to help and work to streamline communication between our professional organization, universities and stakeholders at European level and to project beyond (link between Europe and developing countries).

Amaelle Landais, CNRS Paris, France

Biography

I am using and developing methods mainly based on air and water isotopic measurements in ice cores to better constraint the interactions between climate, hydrological cycle and biosphere over the last Quaternary. I defended my PhD thesis in 2004 at LSCE, spent 2 years as post-doctoral fellow at the Institute of Earth Science in Jerusalem and am back in France since 2007 (LSCE). I have published about 46 scientific papers (15 as main author) and was awarded recently by the scientific franco-israeli foundation (2010), the French science academy (E. Roth award, 2011) and the CNRS bronze medal (2011).

Motivation for serving the EAG council

I am working in an institute where geochemistry is a tool for only a relatively small number of researchers. I thus feel that interacting with many external geochemists at the European level (through for example the Goldschmidt conference) is an important added value to exchange new ideas and share experiences. I thus view the EAG as a useful way to favour and create the regular interactions that we need between European geochemists so I feel a strong interest in serving the EAG council.

Stefano Poli, University of Milan, Italy

Biography

Stefano Poli is professor in petrology at the University of Milan, Italy. His research projects mainly focus on the experimental determination of phase equilibria in volatile-bearing mafic and ultramafic systems at conditions characteristic of subduction zones. Recipient of the 2001 EMU Research Excellence Medal. He founded Petroceramics spa, a spin-off company of the University of Milano, aimed to give industrial value to the know-how developed on complex synthetic materials.

Motivation for serving the EAG council

Stefano Poli, benefiting from previous experience as President of the Italian Society of Mineralogy and Petrology, wishes to promote cooperation between the EAG and other scientific European institutions in Earth Sciences, notably EGU and EMU, in order to develop a more effective action on policymakers and legislators. Common initiatives should support local institutions and representatives in communicating the importance of funding scientific research in geochemistry.